02/06/2013

Syrian Minister: Release the prisoners of conscience in Turkey !

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Information Minister: Erdogan Should Respect His People's Will and Leave for Doha

Jun 2, 2013

Information Minister Omran al-Zoubi called for releasing the prisoners of conscience in Turkey, stressing that there is no justification for the arrest of this huge number of peaceful demonstrators.

Answering questions of the reporters on Sunday, the Minister said the use of excessive force in the face of the Turkish people is wrong, pointing out that the Turkish demonstrators are not terrorists.

Al-Zoubi said there is still an opportunity for Erdogan to halt the violence in Turkey, stressing that Erdogan should respect the will of his people and leave for Doha that might host him.

Popular protests against the policies of the Turkish government of Recep Tayyip Erdogan continued in Ankara and Istanbul for the third day in a row.

The Turkish police have used water cannon and tear gas to disperse a peaceful protest against the destruction of Gezi Park in central Istanbul.

Helicopter launched tear gas on the residential neighborhoods, while photos on the Youtube showed an armored police truck hit a protestor.

Rescue people told the media that about 1000 people were admitted to hospitals in Istanbul, while hundreds others were injured in Ankara due to clashes with the police.

The Amnesty International criticized the use of excessive force by the Turkish police to disperse the popular protests against Erdogan's government, saying "The use of tear gas against peaceful protestors and in confined spaces where it may constitute a serious danger to health is unacceptable, breaches international human rights standards and must be stopped immediately."

Amnesty International Europe and Central Asia Director John Dalhuisen said "The Turkish authorities must order police to halt any excessive use of force and urgently investigate all reports of abuse. They have a duty to ensure that people can exercise their right to free expression and assembly."

H. Said

http://sana.sy/eng/21/2013/06/02/485328.htm

01/03/2013

Latest News Syria: UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs

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Amos: Only USD 200 Million Were Received out of 1.5 Billion in Pledges to Help Syrians

March 1, 2013

NEW YORK, (SANA) – UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, Valerie Amos, said on Thursday that pledges to help Syrians reached USD 1.5 billion, however, only USD 200 million were received.

At a press conference, Amos added, "We are cooperating with UN High Commissioner for Refugees, and we are communicating with the Syrian government and -the Syrian Opposition Coalition-… we are working not only in Damascus, but also in Homs."

F.L/M.Ismael

http://www.sana-syria.com/eng/22/2013/03/01/469994.htm

15/12/2012

U.S. Human Rights: farmers in India

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Over the past 15 years, a scourge of suicides has claimed the lives of an estimated 250,000 farmers in India. And the death count is still climbing, according to a new report by the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice (CHRGJ) at New York University.

“On average, one farmer commits suicide every 30 minutes in India,” said Smita Narula, director of the CHRGJ and co-author of the report, “Every Thirty Minutes: Farmer Suicides, Human Rights, and the Agrarian Crisis in India.”

The report, which focuses primarily on small cotton farmers in India, identifies several likely sources and potential solutions to the suicide epidemic in India. In my view, it gets both of these at least partially wrong.

Generally speaking, the report suggests multinational agribusiness, market reforms and a ludicrously inadequate policy response to the crisis on the part of the Indian government are among the culprits contributing to the tragedy.

While structural market reforms and ineffective government policy clearly has contributed to the suicide epidemic, the claim that multinational companies bear at least part of the blame for these tragedies not only flies in the face of the evidence but is also likely to have perverse consequences.

The analysis suggests that foreign multinational corporations promoting genetically modified cottonseed in India are impinging on the rights of small farmers in India.

The opening of Indian agriculture to the global market and the increasing role of multinational agribusiness giants in cotton production have increased costs, while reducing yields and profits for many farmers, to the point of great financial and emotional distress.

The report singles out Monsanto, a biotechnology and life sciences company based in St. Louis, Mo., as an example of multinational misconduct.

Bt cotton seeds are genetically modified to produce an insecticide that kills Bollworm, a common cotton pest in India. In 2002, the government of India allowed Monsanto to start selling Bt cotton to farmers in India. In the years since, Bt cotton has pervaded cotton farming in India.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/williampentland/2011/05/18/every-30-minutes-an-indian-farmer-commits-suicide-biotech-is-not-to-blame/

25/11/2012

Latest News: Victims of American warfare

orange.victim.american.warfare.jpg“I too am an Agent Orange Second Generation Victim. For years I have felt very isolated and unsure of what to do. I am a wife and mother of 3 healthy children. I am 37 yrs old and was born with Severe Hip Dysplasia. From the time I was 13 months old, I had reconstruction surgery every few years until I was 17 years old and at that time had my 1st Total Hip Replacement. I am now getting ready for my 5th Total Hip Replacement and 4th Pelvic Reconstruction since 17. I am also battling several rare forms of skin cancer that are life threatening. These cancers are seen in older generations that have had "extreme carcinogenic and pesticide exposure". I have had no direct exposure to these. I have gone through 2 rounds of chemotherapy in the last 4 years only to have the cancer come back stronger. I am in surgery for tumor removal at least once a month. The hundreds of scars on my body are horrific. My Doctors cannot put me through anymore chemotherapy as I have been told my body will not make it. There is a drug that is currently in trials that at the very least would buy me some time. The drug companies manufacturing this have denied me access to the trial as I am "too sick" and would "mess up their numbers". I have gone several rounds with the V.A. only to be denied time and again because I don't have Spina Bifida and because my Father served in Vietnam and not my Mother. My Father served in Vietnam during the heaviest spray periods. I have had numerous tests done and every Medical Professional has said without a doubt ALL of my medical issues today and at birth are a DIRECT result of my Father's exposure to Agent Orange. He also has numerous medical conditions ALL of which have been linked to the Agent Orange exposure.”

24/11/2012

Freedom of thought: U.S., NATO, Israel

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'Freedom of thought' is the derivative of and thus is closely linked to other liberties: freedom of religion, freedom of speech, and freedom of expression. It is a very important concept in the western world and nearly all democratic constitutions protect these freedoms.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_of_thought

Photo: On May 7, 1999, NATO fired 3 missiles from different angles to attack the Embassy of China in Yugoslavia, which killed 3 Chinese journalists and injured more than 20. The building of the embassy was seriously damaged. U.S. officials and NATO said the attack on the Chinese Embassy was "a mistake" based on "faulty information".

On Nov. 18, 2012, the Russian TV office was destroyed in an Israeli attack on Gaza.
Earlier attacks heavily damaged two buildings that housed Sky News, Italian RAI, German ARD and Kuwait TV, as well as the Hamas TV station Al Aqsa. Some of the injured were from Ma'an news agency, and a cameraman for al-Quds TV had to have his leg amputated. RT's office in Gaza was affected too. The office of Iran's English-language Press TV channel in Gaza was hit twice in the Israeli aerial assaults.

16/10/2012

Latest News Syria: 'We preach freedom around the world'...

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'We preach freedom around the world'

 

John F. Kennedy 

Civil Rights Address

11 June 1963

 

Good evening, my fellow citizens:

This afternoon, following a series of threats and defiant statements, the presence of Alabama National Guardsmen was required on the University of Alabama to carry out the final and unequivocal order of the United States District Court of the Northern District of Alabama. That order called for the admission of two clearly qualified young Alabama residents who happened to have been born Negro. That they were admitted peacefully on the campus is due in good measure to the conduct of the students of the University of Alabama, who met their responsibilities in a constructive way.

I hope that every American, regardless of where he lives, will stop and examine his conscience about this and other related incidents. This Nation was founded by men of many nations and backgrounds. It was founded on the principle that all men are created equal, and that the rights of every man are diminished when the rights of one man are threatened.

Today, we are committed to a worldwide struggle to promote and protect the rights of all who wish to be free. And when Americans are sent to Vietnam or West Berlin, we do not ask for whites only. It ought to be possible, therefore, for American students of any color to attend any public institution they select without having to be backed up by troops. It ought to to be possible for American consumers of any color to receive equal service in places of public accommodation, such as hotels and restaurants and theaters and retail stores, without being forced to resort to demonstrations in the street, and it ought to be possible for American citizens of any color to register and to vote in a free election without interference or fear of reprisal. It ought to to be possible, in short, for every American to enjoy the privileges of being American without regard to his race or his color. In short, every American ought to have the right to be treated as he would wish to be treated, as one would wish his children to be treated. But this is not the case.

The Negro baby born in America today, regardless of the section of the State in which he is born, has about one-half as much chance of completing a high school as a white baby born in the same place on the same day, one-third as much chance of completing college, one-third as much chance of becoming a professional man, twice as much chance of becoming unemployed, about one-seventh as much chance of earning $10,000 a year, a life expectancy which is 7 years shorter, and the prospects of earning only half as much.

This is not a sectional issue. Difficulties over segregation and discrimination exist in every city, in every State of the Union, producing in many cities a rising tide of discontent that threatens the public safety. Nor is this a partisan issue. In a time of domestic crisis men of good will and generosity should be able to unite regardless of party or politics. This is not even a legal or legislative issue alone. It is better to settle these matters in the courts than on the streets, and new laws are needed at every level, but law alone cannot make men see right. We are confronted primarily with a moral issue. It is as old as the Scriptures and is as clear as the American Constitution.

The heart of the question is whether all Americans are to be afforded equal rights and equal opportunities, whether we are going to treat our fellow Americans as we want to be treated. If an American, because his skin is dark, cannot eat lunch in a restaurant open to the public, if he cannot send his children to the best public school available, if he cannot vote for the public officials who will represent him, if, in short, he cannot enjoy the full and free life which all of us want, then who among us would be content to have the color of his skin changed and stand in his place? Who among us would then be content with the counsels of patience and delay?

One hundred years of delay have passed since President Lincoln freed the slaves, yet their heirs, their grandsons, are not fully free. They are not yet freed from the bonds of injustice. They are not yet freed from social and economic oppression. And this Nation, for all its hopes and all its boasts, will not be fully free until all its citizens are free.

We preach freedom around the world, and we mean it, and we cherish our freedom here at home, but are we to say to the world, and much more importantly, to each other that this is the land of the free except for the Negroes; that we have no second-class citizens except Negroes; that we have no class or caste system, no ghettoes, no master race except with respect to Negroes?

Now the time has come for this Nation to fulfill its promise. The events in Birmingham and elsewhere have so increased the cries for equality that no city or State or legislative body can prudently choose to ignore them. The fires of frustration and discord are burning in every city, North and South, where legal remedies are not at hand. Redress is sought in the streets, in demonstrations, parades, and protests which create tensions and threaten violence and threaten lives.

We face, therefore, a moral crisis as a country and a people. It cannot be met by repressive police action. It cannot be left to increased demonstrations in the streets. It cannot be quieted by token moves or talk. It is a time to act in the Congress, in your State and local legislative body and, above all, in all of our daily lives. It is not enough to pin the blame on others, to say this a problem of one section of the country or another, or deplore the facts that we face. A great change is at hand, and our task, our obligation, is to make that revolution, that change, peaceful and constructive for all. Those who do nothing are inviting shame, as well as violence. Those who act boldly are recognizing right, as well as reality.

Next week I shall ask the Congress of the United States to act, to make a commitment it has not fully made in this century to the proposition that race has no place in American life or law. The Federal judiciary has upheld that proposition in a series of forthright cases. The Executive Branch has adopted that proposition in the conduct of its affairs, including the employment of Federal personnel, the use of Federal facilities, and the sale of federally financed housing. But there are other necessary measures which only the Congress can provide, and they must be provided at this session. The old code of equity law under which we live commands for every wrong a remedy, but in too many communities, in too many parts of the country, wrongs are inflicted on Negro citizens and there are no remedies at law. Unless the Congress acts, their only remedy is the street.

I am, therefore, asking the Congress to enact legislation giving all Americans the right to be served in facilities which are open to the public -- hotels, restaurants, theaters, retail stores, and similar establishments. This seems to me to be an elementary right. Its denial is an arbitrary indignity that no American in 1963 should have to endure, but many do.

I have recently met with scores of business leaders urging them to take voluntary action to end this discrimination, and I have been encouraged by their response, and in the last two weeks over 75 cities have seen progress made in desegregating these kinds of facilities. But many are unwilling to act alone, and for this reason, nationwide legislation is needed if we are to move this problem from the streets to the courts.

I'm also asking the Congress to authorize the Federal Government to participate more fully in lawsuits designed to end segregation in public education. We have succeeded in persuading many districts to desegregate voluntarily. Dozens have admitted Negroes without violence. Today, a Negro is attending a State-supported institution in every one of our 50 States, but the pace is very slow.

Too many Negro children entering segregated grade schools at the time of the Supreme Court's decision nine years ago will enter segregated high schools this fall, having suffered a loss which can never be restored. The lack of an adequate education denies the Negro a chance to get a decent job.

The orderly implementation of the Supreme Court decision, therefore, cannot be left solely to those who may not have the economic resources to carry the legal action or who may be subject to harassment.

Other features will be also requested, including greater protection for the right to vote. But legislation, I repeat, cannot solve this problem alone. It must be solved in the homes of every American in every community across our country. In this respect I wanna pay tribute to those citizens North and South who've been working in their communities to make life better for all. They are acting not out of sense of legal duty but out of a sense of human decency. Like our soldiers and sailors in all parts of the world they are meeting freedom's challenge on the firing line, and I salute them for their honor and their courage.

My fellow Americans, this is a problem which faces us all -- in every city of the North as well as the South. Today, there are Negroes unemployed, two or three times as many compared to whites, inadequate education, moving into the large cities, unable to find work, young people particularly out of work without hope, denied equal rights, denied the opportunity to eat at a restaurant or a lunch counter or go to a movie theater, denied the right to a decent education, denied almost today the right to attend a State university even though qualified. It seems to me that these are matters which concern us all, not merely Presidents or Congressmen or Governors, but every citizen of the United States.

This is one country. It has become one country because all of us and all the people who came here had an equal chance to develop their talents. We cannot say to ten percent of the population that you can't have that right; that your children cannot have the chance to develop whatever talents they have; that the only way that they are going to get their rights is to go in the street and demonstrate. I think we owe them and we owe ourselves a better country than that.

Therefore, I'm asking for your help in making it easier for us to move ahead and to provide the kind of equality of treatment which we would want ourselves; to give a chance for every child to be educated to the limit of his talents.

As I've said before, not every child has an equal talent or an equal ability or equal motivation, but they should have the equal right to develop their talent and their ability and their motivation, to make something of themselves.

We have a right to expect that the Negro community will be responsible, will uphold the law, but they have a right to expect that the law will be fair, that the Constitution will be color blind, as Justice Harlan said at the turn of the century.

This is what we're talking about and this is a matter which concerns this country and what it stands for, and in meeting it I ask the support of all our citizens.

Thank you very much.

http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/jfkcivilrights.htm

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Washington is responsible for terrorist acts and death of Syrian civilians

Obama signed a secret order authorizing U.S. support for Syrian terrorists seeking to depose Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his government. Obama’s order, approved earlier this year and known as an intelligence “finding,” broadly permits the CIA and other U.S. agencies to provide support that could help the terrorists oust Assad.  C.I.A. officers are operating secretly in southern Turkey. The weapons, including automatic rifles, rocket-propelled grenades, ammunition and some antitank weapons, are being funneled mostly across the Turkish border by way of a shadowy network of intermediaries including Syria’s Muslim Brotherhood and paid for by Turkey, Saudi Arabia and Qatar. The United States is setting up joint military, intelligence and medical working teams with Israel, Turkey and Jordan.

Photo: Vietnam

12/09/2012

Human rights first: the right to self-determination

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The right of nations to self-determination (from German: Selbstbestimmungsrecht der Völker), or in short form, self-determination is the principle in international law that nations have the right to freely choose their sovereignty and international political status with no external compulsion or interference.

Photo: American drone, bombing