24/01/2014

Saudi Arabian women raise their voices

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Saudi Arabia that, with American and Israeli military support, is responsible for the war on Syria, is one of the worst countries for women

Saudi Arabia’s oppression of women goes way beyond its ban on driving

October 28, 2013

For the second time in three years, dozens of Saudi women are getting behind the wheel to protest their country’s practice of forbidding driver’s licenses for women. The de facto ban on female drivers is Saudi Arabia’s best-known restriction against women, a symbol of the larger system of gender-based law that makes it one of the worst countries for women, according to the World Economic Forum’s annual report on gender rights.
Saudi Arabia’s restrictions on women go far, far beyond just driving, though. It’s part of a larger system of customs and laws that make women heavily reliant on men for their basic, day-to-day survival. This video, produced by Amnesty U.K. in 2011, a few months after Saudi women’s rights activists staged their last protest drive, helps explain just how it works to be a woman in Saudi Arabia. (Fair warning, the video has an offbeat sense of humor, which I wrote about here.)

If you couldn’t make it through the video, here’s the rundown: each Saudi woman has a “male guardian,” typically their father or brother or husband, who has the same sort of legal power over her that a parent has over a child. She needs his formal permission to travel, work, go to school or get medical treatment. She’s also dependent on him for everything: money, housing, and, because the driving ban means she needs a driver to go anywhere, even the ability to go to the store or visit a friend.
It’s one thing for women to depend on men to go anywhere, putting their movement under male veto power. But it’s quite another when they also must have a man’s approval to travel abroad, get a job or do just about anything that involves being outside of the home. It consigns women to second-class-citizenship, which is unfortunately common in a number of countries, but goes a step further in Saudi Arabia. Saudi women have many of their most basic rights reduced to probationary privileges, granted only if the man who is assigned as their “guardian” feels like granting them. And because women are typically forbidden to interact with men who are not family members, they’ve got little to no recourse beyond that guardian. The almost complete lack of political rights doesn’t help, either.

Read more at:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2013/10...

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