24/05/2013

Secretary-General of the United Nations, Ban Ki-moon, visits Pentagon

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Photo: American Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, left, escorts United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon into the Pentagon as Ban Ki-moon arrives for an honor cordon, Thursday, April 18, 2013.

Ban Ki-moon has very close ties with the American government.  

He earned a Master of Public Administration from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He further received an honorary degree of Doctor of Laws from the University of Washington. He has been posted twice to the South Korean embassy in Washington, D.C. Between these two assignments he served as Director-General for American Affairs in 1990–1992. He was the foreign minister of South Korea from January 2004 to November 2006 and in February 2006, he began to campaign for the office of Secretary-General.

While he is continuously talking in a hypocrite way about the 'Syrian Civil War' and he continuously criticizes the Syrian government, he remains silent about the American en Saudi-Arabian arms deliveries to the so called 'Free Syrian Army' and Syrian terrorist groups. Yesterday a top commander of a foreign-backed group fighting against the Syrian government said he has received a 35-ton arms shipment from Saudi Arabia...

On March 23, 2011, the U.N. Security Council adopted a wide-ranging resolution recommending 'humanitarian' and military action inside Libya. Both U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and Arab League Secretary-General Amr Moussa were assigned key roles in “coordinating” the implementation of the mandate. Just like now, Ban Ki-moon was calling for “an immediate end to violence by all parties'.  Just like now, he was talking about 'chemical weapons' and he called for a 'no-fly zone' which was just a pretext to bomb Lybia and to destroy the regime of Colonel Gadaffi. While the Lybian infrastructure was completely destroyed, he said the UN-mandated military operation was 'proving effective in protecting civilians'. 

Recently Ban Ki-moon is echoing the Russian en Syrian proposes for a 'political dialogue' but at the same time he imposes unreasonable requirements that makes such a dialogue impossible. The current United States Secretary of State John Forbes Kerry, who expects a failure of political dialogue, said 'recent military gains by Assad's forces were only temporary'. So it is clear that the American government still hopes on a military intervention. 

It is certainly not good for the credibility of the UN that its Secretary-General, as a friend to U.S. national interests in the United Nations, only advances U.S. and western-backed approaches in the Middle East, North Africa, and North Korea.

http://www.ipsnews.net/2011/03/libya-un-chiefs-ambivalent-role-in-the-no-fly-zone/

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-12858751

http://reformdesa.blogspot.be/2011/03/ban-ki-moons-no-fly-zone.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/21/world/middleeast/cia-said-to-aid-in-steering-arms-to-syrian-rebels.html?pagewanted=all

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Political solution ?  

'$10 billion arms deal with Israel, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates'

April 18, 2013

WASHINGTON — The Defense Department is expected to finalize a $10 billion arms deal with Israel, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates next week that will provide missiles, warplanes and troop transports.

A weeklong visit to the region by Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel will culminate a year of secret negotiations on a deal that Congressional officials said will be second only to the $29.5 billion sale of F-15 aircraft to Saudi Arabia announced in 2010. 

While one goal was to ensure that Israel continues to field the most capable armed forces in the region. It was equally important to improve the capabilities of two important Arab military partners.  

The objective, one senior administration official said, was “not just to boost Israel’s capabilities, but also to boost the capabilities of our Persian Gulf partners and also provide a greater network of coordinated assets around the region to handle a range of contingencies.”

Under the agreement, each country would be allowed to purchase advanced armaments from American contractors. In the case of Israel, there is also substantial American financial assistance, topping $3 billion in military aid this fiscal year.

Israel would buy new missiles designed to take out an adversary’s air-defense radars, as well as advanced radars for its own warplanes, new refueling tanker planes and — in the first sale to any foreign military — the V-22 Osprey troop transport aircraft.

The United Arab Emirates would buy 26 F-16 warplanes, a package that could reach $5 billion alone, along with precision missiles that could be launched from those jets at distant ground targets. Saudi Arabia would buy the same class of advanced missile.

The expectation is that the arms sale, which was outlined to Congress on Thursday, will encounter little opposition from lawmakers, especially from members representing the many districts where defense contractors are concerned about the impact of cutbacks in the Pentagon’s own weapons budget.

Under the terms of the deal, Israel would be allowed to buy the tilt-rotor V-22 Osprey, an aircraft that can take off and land like a helicopter but fly with the speeds and range of an airplane. Israel could use the Osprey for patrolling its borders, coastline and out to sea, and for moving troops to troubled areas.

A new generation of KC-135 refueling tanker planes would let Israel’s warplanes stay in the air longer, an ability essential for any long-range mission — like a strike on Iran. 

Israel also would receive antiradiation missiles. Launched from a warplane, they can home in on an adversary’s air-defense radar signals and destroy those sites. New, advanced radars for Israel’s military jets also would be in the package. 

Administration officials declined to identify the new missile to be sold to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, except to say that it is an advanced class of precision “standoff munitions” — those designed to be launched from warplanes safely distant from ground targets. The missile would fit the 84 F-15s that Saudi Arabia is currently buying under the previous arms deal, and it would be carried by the 26 F-16s the United Arab Emirates would buy under the new one.

Officials said Israel was assured that use of the advanced missiles would be monitored by United States Air Force personnel who train alongside both the Saudi and emirates militaries, and that any deployment would occur only after consultation with the Americans.

During his coming trip to Israel, Mr. Hagel will move to finalize the arms deal with Mr. Barak’s successor, Moshe Yaalon. Mr. Hagel will finalize the deal with Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates in visits to the two countries later next week.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/19/world/middleeast/us-selling-arms-to-israel-saudi-arabia-and-emirates.html?_r=0

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