31/10/2012

Turkish missiles are designed by Israel

Popey.missile.Israel.jpgPopeye missiles

The Popeye is an air to ground missile developed by Israel.

It is is designed for precision attack against large targets from stand off ranges. The standard Popeye and smaller Popeye-Lite are powered by a single stage solid rocket, a jet engine propels the Popeye Turbo variants.

An inertial guidance system pilots the missile towards the target; for terminal homing the pilot can control the missile directly via an INS and data link, aiming via either a television or imaging infrared seeker depending on the missile model. It is not necessary for the launching aircraft to direct the missile - control can be passed to another platform whilst the firing aircraft escapes the area.

The alleged Israeli submarine launched cruise missile variant is reported to be jet powered and nuclear armed with a greatly increased range.

Israel has exported Popeye and its variants to various friendly countries.

The United States Air Force first bought a batch of 154 missiles in 1989 followed by a second batch of 54 missiles in 1996.

In May 1997, Israel and Turkey signed an agreement valued in excess of US $500 million for the establishment of a joint-venture between Israel's Rafael and Turkey's Turkish Aerospace Industries for the co-production of Popeye I and Popeye II missiles in Turkey.
The Turkish Air Force's F-4 2020 Terminator aircraft and the TuAF F-16 CCIP are armed with a Turkish License production version of the Popeye.

On October 4, 2012, Adm. George Stavridis, the commander of US European Command (USEUCOM) and NATO’s Supreme Allied Commander Europe (SACEUR), met with Chief of General Staff Gen. Necdet Ozel in Ankara. The meeting took place at General Staff headquarters but was only announced to the public in a statement released by the General Staff some days later. The talks were closed to the press and the statement did not elaborate on what Stavridis and Ozel discussed.

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