14/07/2012

Clinton talks about 'human rights' in Cambodia...

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Human Rights Watch and Clinton talking about 'human rights' in Cambodia...

July 9, 2012 (New York) – United States Secretary of State Hillary Clinton should make it clear in public and private to Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen that closer relations with the US will not be possible without significant improvements in the deteriorating human rights situation in Cambodia. Clinton will visit Cambodia from July 11-13 for the annual Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) heads of government meeting.

http://www.hrw.org/news/2012/07/09/cambodia-clinton-shoul...

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Cambodian-Vietnam border: 2.750.000 tons of bombs...

Starting in April 1969 the United States started dropping bombs along the Cambodian-Vietnam border, 2,750,000 tons of bombs in total over a 14 month period (more than the total dropped by the Allies during World War II). The bombing was hidden from the American public.

Following the coup of Prince Sihanouk in 1970 Cambodia's borders became closed and the United States invaded Cambodia, claiming they were trying to buy time for the South Vietnamese army to gain advantage against the Viet Cong. Nixon announced the invasion of Cambodia on April 30th 1970 on national television.

The invasion of Cambodia however sparked protests back in the United States, most notably at Kent State University in Ohio. The Ohio National Guard was called in to remove the protestors and shot into crowds of people, killing four students, some of them bystanders. In response to the shootings hundreds of universities, colleges, and high schools closed throughout the United States due to a student strike of eight million students, and the event further divided the United States public over the war.

In 1971 the Pentagon Papers were leaked to The New York Times. The top-secret history of U.S. involvement in Vietnam, commissioned by the Department of Defense, detailed a long series of public deceptions. The same year the South Vietnamese army launched an attack in neighbouring Laos, a neutral country. Despite the American training and Vietnamization of the South Vietnam military the action was a complete rout. They met with unforeseen resistance and went into full scale retreat. When they ran out of fuel, soldiers abandoned their vehicles and attempted to barge their way on to American helicopters sent to evacuate the wounded. Half of the invading South Vietnamese troops were either captured or killed. The operation was a fiasco and represented a clear failure of Vietnamization, despite many of their military leaders being shipped back and forth to the United States for training over a period of 10 to 15 years.

In 1971 Australia and New Zealand withdrew their soldiers. The U.S. troop count was further reduced to 196,700, with a deadline to remove another 45,000 troops by February 1972.

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